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Sylvia Chang
    2008-04-23 18:07:38     CRIENGLISH.com

Sylvia Chang, or Zhang Aijia, has starred in more than 100 movies in her 30-year film career. She is an award-winning actress, successful director, and sometime singer. In today's "Champion" segment, our reporter Weiyi tell about Sylvia Chang's life and her 30 years on the big screen.

Sylvia Chang [photo source: pic.96666.com]

Sylvia Chang was born in Taipei and went to study in the United States at an early age.When she was only 16 years old, she dropped out of school to become a radio DJ. Three years later, Sylvia Chang made her debut in the film industry in the movie "Tattooed Dragon." Over the next few years, she starred in a number of romantic and action movies, which were popular among Chinese audience. She had the opportunity to work with some of the best directors of the time, including King Hu and Ang Lee.

Though she is not a classical beauty, Chang's passion and genuine characteristics make her shine in any film. People always remember her bright eyes and sweet smile. She has displayed her versatility in the wide range of roles that she has played, from an innocent girl to a streetwalker, from a rude police officer to a respected teacher, from an alcoholic to a perfect mother. She believes that effort is the key to success in acting.

"In the entertainment industry, besides talent, you should be hardworking and have luck. Everyone who enters the entertainment industry will undergo hardships."

After acting for nearly a decade, Chang decided to try directing. In 1986, she directed and acted in the film "Passion." The film proved her directorial skills and won her the Best Actress Award at the Hong Kong Film Awards.

In the 1990's, she directed more films, the most popular of which was "20, 30, 40," which Chang also starred in. The film focuses on contemporary Taiwan women and their complicated lives. Like most of her films, "20, 30, 40" followed modern women in their search for happiness and fulfillment.

Whether portraying the courage of a lonely girl or the emotions between men and women, Sylvia Chang successfully captures the feelings hiding inside a woman's heart. As a veteran director, she clearly knows what her audience wants.

"Making films requires professional knowledge. People who pay to watch a film want to see its high quality and good content. A director should know what he wants to express in a film. When I shoot a film, the story should be compelling."

As a director, 55-year-old Sylvia Chang isn't showing any signs of slowing down. She has once again taken the spotlight with her latest work, "Run Papa Run." Though Sylvia Chang used to take more on women-oriented roles, this time she expresses her thoughts from a man's viewpoint.

The film is about a mob boss whose life is changed forever by the birth of his daughter. The film narrows in on his attempts to keep his double life as a father and gangster in balance. At the end of the film, he finally realizes what's important in his life and gives up crime to be a good father.

Films make up only part of Sylvia Chang's 30 years in the entertainment industry. She is also a well-known singer, and has sung many popular songs. Let's listen to her song "The Cost of Love," a karaoke hit.

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