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2010-08-03 Iodine Content in Salt
    2010-08-04 10:59:24     CRIENGLISH.com      Web Editor: Qin Mei
Severe mental impairment and significant swelling around your neck are symptoms of a diet lacking in iodine.
 
Concentrations of this trace element can vary across the world. In some areas it is plentiful and is absorbed into the food we eat. But in other areas differing environmental conditions can mean the element is missing from our diets.
 
Adding iodine to salt is seen as a way of solving the problem and in the last fifteen years China has made significant progress. Now the Ministry of Health is looking at the implications of too much iodine in the diet. It is to consider halving the amount added to salt.
 
So how big a problem is iodine deficiency across the world; and how can China’s success in increasing the intake of iodine be replicated in other countries?

Ni hao, you're listening to  People In the Know, bringing you insights into the headline news in China and around the world, online at CRIENGLISH.com, and here on China Radio International. In today’s program we’ll discuss the health implications of using iodine fortified salt.

First we’ll speak with Ms. Li Mu who is the Associate Professor in International Public Health at The University of Sydney.
 
(Conversation with (Professor Li Mu )

And after a short break we’ll talk to an expert from the World Health Organisation.

Ni hao, you're listening to  People In the Know, bringing you insights into the headline news in China and around the world, online at CRIENGLISH.com, and here on China Radio International. I'm Nigel Ballard in Beijing.

The successful steps taken by China to tackle iodine deficiency disorder have been recognised across the world. For more we shall speak with Dr Peter Ben Embarek who is the World Health Organisation China’s Technical Officer for Food Safety.

(Conversation with Dr Peter Ben Embarek)

And with that we conclude this edition of  People In the Know, online at CRIENGLISH.com and here on China Radio International.

Despite all that is known about how to prevent iodine deficiency disorder it is still a problem across the world. The success China has had in using fortified salt to deal with the problem can provide lessons for the rest of the world.

Questions or comments for us can be sent to people@cri.com.cn. You can also listen to our show on your mobile by logging onto m.cri.cn. The Programme Producers are Chen Mo, Lu Yuan and Interns Guo Ling Zhi and Wang Lin; I'm Nigel Ballard in Beijing. We'll talk to you on Monday. 

 
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