South-to-North Water Diversion Project

The South-to-North Water Diversion Project is a strategic solution project to divert water from south China to the thirsty north. After 50 years of field study and measuring by scientists, China decides to launch the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in 2002.

The project comprises the eastern, the central and western routes. Huge amounts of water will be diverted from the lower, middle and upper reaches of Yangtze River through the eastern, central, and western routes to Huanghuaihai Plain, Jiaodong region and the upper and middle reaches of the Yellow River, especially at the areas of north China. The project is expected to form an efficient water supply network with four major rivers from west to east and three routes from south to north.

The eastern route will divert water from the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China's longest river, through Hongze Lake, Luoma Lake, Nansi Lake, Dongping Lake, to the Yellow river and to Yantai and Weihai Shangdong Province.

The central route is to divert water from the Dajingkou water reservoir along the Hanjiang River, a tributary of the Yangtze River, to Beijing and Tianjin, as well as cities along the Beijing-Guangzhou Railway in Hebei and Henan provinces.

The western route is to divert water from the Dadu, Yalong and Tongtian rivers, to the upper reaches of the Yellow River to increase water supply in the Ninxia Hui Autonomous Region, the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and Shaanxi Province.

It is planned that 44.8 billion cubic meters (11.88 trillion gallons) of water will be diverted through the eastern, central, and western routes, with 14.8 billion cubic meters in the eastern route, 13 billion cubic meters in the central, and 17 billion cubic meters in the western.

At present four component projects have been under construction in the east and central routes.